MoneyStream

What They Do
Money Stream is an all-in-one money management service that puts all the disparate and fragmented tasks associated with finances (banking, bill pay, record keeping, and payment schedules) and streamlines them into a single online service.

Funding Rounds
April 16, 2015
$3.2 million

Why We Like Their Name
It’s a nice combination of two words. Infinitely memorable, Money Stream does what the name implies, it manages your money in all its streams with one service.

ShopSpring

What They Do
Founded by three New Yorkers, Shop Spring is on a mission to create the best mobile shopping experience by allowing their users to follow their favorite brands. You’ll know when the next big thing hits the stores and can snag your faves with the swipe of your finger.

Funding Rounds
April 16, 2015
$25 million

July 9, 2014
$7.5 million

Why We Like Their Name
Another easy to remember two word name, Shop Spring gets you jumping to your new threads and has enough hop in its step to make you think of something on the go. Perfect for a mobile device.

ScoreBig

What They Do
Score Big stands out from the live entertainment ticket crowd by offering big savings on sports, music, and theater tickets. Every ticket on ScoreBig.com is below the box office price, guaranteed. They can offer these savings because the founders have backgrounds in the NBA, NFL, theater, and arts and they know how to find unsold tickets and pass savings onto you. Search their database of thousands of daily games and performances.

Funding Rounds
April 16, 2015
$7 million

October 28, 2014
$18 million

September 10, 2013
$10 million

April 20, 2011
$14.1 million

April 26, 2010
$5 million

March 1, 2010
$2.4 million

Why We Like Their Name
Yikes! Score Big is yet another two word name that’s radio friendly. You can’t mess up the spelling of this website and the name gives you a hint at what they do. We especially like it for a sports ticket box office.


Everfest

What They Do
Everfest connects people who have similar interests and brings them together physically offline. It’s a way to discover festivals, book unique travel opportunities, find other revelers, and share memories. As they say, life’s a journey. You have to find the clowns that make you dance and ride the magic. Everfest helps you find that magic.

Funding Rounds
April 3, 2015
$1.5 million

Why We Like Their Name
We’ve mentioned it plenty of times but here it is again: a great strategy for a domain name consists of two, solid words that tell exactly what our business does. And this name didn’t cost them a fortune.

Amberjack

What They Do
Founded by two anglers from Maine and Montana, Amberjack gets people away from their computers and out in the water with a fishing rod in hand and in the company of family and friends. They can book your trip, outfit you with the best gear, and find you a place to stay. Amberjack wants you away from your screen and out on the river.

Funding Rounds
April 6, 2015
$500,000

Why We Like Their Name
Great general name that makes sense for what they do. While it probably cost them a fair amount of money, amberjack isn’t as high-profile a fish as trout or yellowfin, so the most likely got this name for under six figures.

SimpleTherapy

What They Do
SimpleTherapy understands that you can’t leave work to visit a physical therapy clinic and that the cost can be prohibitive, so they offer online video exercise therapy that’s personalized and adaptive. You can rehabilitate at your leisure at anytime, anywhere, and for an affordable price. They are the low-cost solution for the millions of adults who experience musculoskeletal pain, the number two reason for doctor’s visits in the United States.

Funding Rounds
April 3, 2015
$1.8 million

Why We Like Their Name
Many startups try to make things simpler and easier to use and this is what SimpleTherapy does in the world of physical therapy. I probably sound like a broken record, but this is another nice two-word domain that was most likely purchased at a reasonable price.


Mommy Nearest

What They Do
Mommy Nearest is a mobile community for parents and caregivers. They offer reviews and specifications for the best places to take children. Mommy Nearest boasts over 150,000 users and provides unique content and geography-based, word-of-mouth recommendations. Then, they add a parenting magazine to the mix and you have a potent helping hand for any parent or guardian who’s on the go. Think of Mommy Nearest as Yelp meets Parenting magazine.

Funding Rounds
March 20, 2015
$1 million

January 23, 2015
$1.5 million

February 1, 2012
$350,000

Why We Like Their Name
Mommy Nearest plays off the term, Mommy Dearest. You get a good idea about what the company does, which is always a good thing for a name, and they didn’t have to break the bank in getting their domain.

Rover

What They Do
Have you ever had a problem trying to find someone to look after your four-legged friend? You won’t anymore. Rover.com connects dog owners nationwide with dog lovers for hire. It’s a network that makes it easy for dog owners to reach dog sitters who offer in-home boarding, pet sitting, dog walking, and day care. Their sitters have a wide coverage (more than 92 percent of the United States population lives within a short drive of a Rover sitter) and each one gets graded on a five-star system.

Funding Rounds
March 19, 2015
$25 million

November 4, 2014
Undisclosed amount (but it included Petco)

March 12, 2014
$12 million

July 30, 2013
$3.5 million

April 9, 2012
$3.4 million

Why We Like Their Name
This name cost this company some money, but it was probably less than six-figures. When we saw it, we thought that they must do something with dogs, and they do. A good name should always hint at what your company’s about.

Joyable
What They Do
Joyable provides an effective and affordable online solution for overcoming social anxiety. They use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) that’s proven to reduce social anxiety. And since they’re an online company, they offer this service in a convenient and private setting. Joyable’s technology makes it easy for you to get started, and their coaches ensure that their clients succeed. Anyone is able to enjoy social gatherings with Joyable.

Funding Rounds
March 18, 2015
$2.1 million

Why We Like Their Name
We are a fan of adding endings like “able,” “ly,” and “sy” to a common word. Often, you’ll can get an easy to pronounce, short name that doesn’t cost a fortune—just like this name.


Startups usually ask themselves this question early in their naming process: should they decide on a company name and then look for a domain to match, or should they find a domain they can purchase and then base their company name on their domain name?

With so much business being conducted online, it’s actually easier to base a brandable company name around a domain name than the other way around. In fact, older, established companies can have a hard time fitting domain names to their business.

If you’re a startup company, you don’t have to worry about matching a domain to your company. Find a domain you can acquire and then base a brandable company name from that. But beware of any trademark or copyright infringements. Check to see if your name can be linked to another business—just because you’ve never heard of it, doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist—by using the following link:

http://www.uspto.gov/trademarks-application-process/search-trademark-database

You should also search against your perspective name on Google and see what results you get. These results will give you an idea of how many other domains have similar naming conventions and topics, and how difficult it will be for your new site to rank in Google.

Like we’ve mentioned in previous posts, you should be shooting for a .com. Yes, you can acquire a .biz, .org, .net, .info, and the list of web extensions goes on, but the king of all website extensions is .com. If you don’t have a .com, you don’t have the name, but you most likely won’t be able to hand register a .com. This is where MediaPlow can help.

If you’re looking for some creative business name ideas, feel free to contact us, and we would be happy to assist you.


You have two main options when buying a domain name: hand registering one for $10 on Go Daddy (or a similar site) or purchasing a domain name from a domain marketplace like Media Plow. Yes, you will be spending more for a domain, but these aftermarket sites help you as a business owner. We know the business of domain names. We know what will appeal to both you and your customers. Purchasing a domain from an aftermarket is a boon. Here are some of the other benefits.

The Pinnacle of Domain Extensions: The Dot Com
When folks tell you that they own a website, they don’t usually include the extension. It’s understood that the extension is “.com.” Anything less than a .com isn’t worth it and everything for sale on a domain marketplace is a .com. You get quality over quantity and that quality leads to more business.

Good .coms Grant You Instant Credibility
Media Plow sells premium names and there’s a reason these names are dubbed premium. Premium domains are very catchy and tell consumers what the site does. Don’t believe us? Cabinets.com did more cabinet business last year than their rival, the giant Home Depot, all because cabinets is their domain name. When you e-mail someone with your domain name attached, potential customers read your domain in each message, and a good .com will get you the traction you need to make a name for yourself.

You’ll find a large number of creative business domains on our site. These domains get more clicks, capture more new customers, and stick your domain name in consumers’ heads.

Don’t Waste Your Time
I’ve spent countless hours on Go Daddy, plugging in names only to find out that the name’s already taken. You’ll spend less time browsing a Media Plow and you’re guaranteed a good name that fits your business. I don’t know how many times I’ve given up on a name thread with Go Daddy, only to settle for a subpar name.

Don’t Settle for Less than the Best
More often than not when you search Go Daddy for a name, you’ll end up with your third, fourth, or thirty-ninth choice, and chances are that your thirty-ninth choice wasn’t nearly as good as your first. Media Plow can give you a homerun on the first try. You’ll find a name you want and one that you’ll be proud to own.

Ultimately, the choice is yours. But if you’re serious about your business and domain, you owe it to yourself to check out what Media Plow has to offer.


You have a great product, done the ground work for your business, and you’re ready to go public, but you don’t know what to call your company. Finding a catchy name for your business can be an anxiety-filled experience, but there are guidelines for creating the perfect business name. Let’s start with what you should do when choosing a creative business name.

Do:

Pick a name that resonates with your customers

We know that you put in a lot of hard work and love into your company and products, but you can’t pick a name that only you can get behind. You need to share the love of your company by thinking about what your customers enjoy. Do this, and your passion will spread.

Pick a name that shows what you do

Your customers should know what you do at a glance from your business name. Very few companies can get away with choosing names that mask what they do. A business name like “Mixed Beans” would work for a coffee company, a bean outlet store or even a beanbag chair retailer, but “Mixed Beans” wouldn’t work for much else, even if your last name happens to be Bean. Your customers will ask you, “Where’s the beans?”

Pick a name that reflects your company’s values

Whenever possible, you should include one of your company’s core values—or at least imply something that your company believes—in your business name. Do you offer quick service? Use a word that flies. Do you focus on security? Let your customers know how secure your products are in your name.

Make a list of words with the above ideas in mind

Now it’s time to break out your thesaurus and cook a little word gumbo. Using the guidelines above, make a list of as many words that work for your business values, what your company does and what motivates your customers. Don’t filter this list. A word you don’t plan to use may lead you to the word you should use. Once you have a healthy list going, you can start to trim the fat, which leads us to our next item.

Play on a common phrases using these words

This isn’t always an option, but we’re sure you came across some words you’ve heard used together while compiling the above list. If it’s a phrase you’ve heard your customers use before, it’s definitely a safe bet for your company name. But you should consider twisting the phrase. English is wonderful for all the multiple words that sound alike but have different meanings: to, too and two; rain, rein and reign; carat, caret and carrot; real eyes, realize and real lies.

Keep it simple

Your customers shouldn’t need a decoder ring to figure out what your business name means and you should have a short name that’s easy to remember.

And now for the Don’ts.

Don’t:

Pick a name that only makes sense to you

Piggybacking off the decoder ring comment above, you shouldn’t use an inside joke for your business name. The idea of an inside joke is that it’s only funny to people on the inside and you want to be as inclusive as possible so you can attract more customers.

Pick a name on a whim

We know the process can be a difficult one, but you shouldn’t chose your name out of desperation or frustration. Take the time to get the right name for your business. You’ll thank us later.

Use acronyms

They used to be en vogue—IBM, 3M, TNT to name a few—but they’ve fallen out of favor. Acronyms don’t work as well as they used to because you often have to explain them and as mentioned earlier, you should keep it simple.

As long as you follow these guidelines, you should be ready to do the final steps required for obtaining your business’s domain name and social media accounts.

Finalizing your name on the internet

You should input your new name into search engines like Google and Yahoo! to see what kind of returns you get. You’d hate to own a shiny new name that’s similar to an unsightly site. After you finish this, type your new name with a .com suffix into your web browser to see if it’s available. Then, you should consult a lawyer and check out the name on www.whois.net, which lists registered domain names. Who Is can let you know of recently expired domains or if the previous owner of the domain violated a Google term and is now banned from Google searches. You wouldn’t want to buy a brand new domain that Google won’t search for.

If you still can’t come up with a great name, there’s always surfing the many, sparkling names on Media Plow. Check out our menu of catchy, creative business names.


Here are some links to other great articles about things to consider when naming your startup.

http://venturebeat.com/2014/06/27/hey-founders-before-you-name-your-startup-something-stupid-read-this/

http://www.buildbrandblast.com/finding-a-great-domain-name-for-startup-tech-companies/

http://mashable.com/2012/05/22/techstars-startup-names/

 


Almost two decades after the dot-com boom the “.com” generic top-level domain (gTLD) remains the most important, most used and often the most expensive gTLD to attain. Sure, you could call Debbie’s Books, “debbiesbooks.biz” or “.me” or “.pro” or “.name” or any of the other “.somethings” you may find out there, but decades of “.coms” have hardwired users to look for “.com” at the end of every website.

In fact, this new crop of gTLDs has made owning a “.com” even more important. There are so many of these new gTLDs that costumers get confused whenever they see them. Is it debbiesbooks.biz or debbiesbooks.bizz or debbies.books? People will assume your website’s name is debbiesbooks.com, and you could be losing business to a competitor if you don’t have that .com. It would take many, many years and hundreds of millions of dollars to educate your consumers that your website is anything but debbiesbooks.com.

People associate “.com” with company. They see green when they read “.com,” while they’ll see fake, Monopoly money when they see most of anything else. Let your clients/customers know you’re serious about what you do with the credibility of a great .com.

And if you have the time, check out the great .coms here at Media Plow.


Your startup needs a domain with a spiffy name, and you shouldn’t take this decision likely. A domain name may be the most important decision you make. You don’t want a hodge-podge of made-up words that make no sense, and your name needs to reflect who you are and what you do. Clarity reigns supreme on today’s internet but in today’s business world, it’s a name is a global decision.

Here are some guidelines for choosing a name that will give you an advantage over your competitors.

Pick an Unforgettable Name
You want people to remember your name when they start typing in the address bars of their web browsers or when they search for you. Your name needs to stick in their head, but this stickiness is a challenge because naming trends change with the tides, often year by year (sometimes every few months) which makes a timeless name almost impossible to find.

Avoid Cute Spellings
Your name needs to pass the “Radio Test.” If you heard your domain name on the radio, would you know how to spell it? If you wouldn’t be able to spell your domain name without someone explaining the reason why you used a Z for an S or omitted a vowel or two, don’t spell your domain that way. There are some companies that have had success with strange spellings, but these domains were either the first in their field or the owners spent a lot of money to get people to spell their words incorrectly the correct way.

Pronounceable
This guideline goes hand-in-hand with the previous two. Forget the nonsensical mish-mash of phrases that kind of explain what your business does (more on this later). Customers need names they can pronounce and remember. And while we’re at it, don’t use acronyms. Leave acronyms for texting and IMing, unless of course, the acronym is well known in those circles, but most of those names have already been claimed.

Make Sense
Sometimes business owners choose names that aren’t cute spellings or weird compound words like Fogdog (that don’t give their customers a clue of what they do—I thought they were a search engine when I first heard the name). Sometimes owners pick words that have no meaning at all (we’re looking at you Twitter). Again, there are plenty of success stories, but it takes a lot to brand these names, even though you’ll have no problem securing the trademarks. If you do choose to make up a word, make sure it doesn’t have negative or even obscene connotations in another language. Remember that you’re domain goes on the “World” Wide Web.

Give Customers a Clue
Does the name make sense for what you do? If you’re a tech company that uses the cloud in its processes, you may want to use the word “cloud” in your name. Either use cloud in a made-up name that’s easy to spell like Cloudova or combine another word with cloud like DivCloud or TierCloud.

Favor Common Suffixes
People will assume that your company name just scrapes off the .com suffix. If .com isn’t available for your company name, choose a different company name. Even seasoned domainers and the tech industry at large view the new domain extensions as confusing. There are some success stories about non-.com companies, but these companies still end up purchasing the .com suffix of their name eventually.

Is the name Available?
This sounds like a no-brainer, but check to make sure that there isn’t a company with a name exactly or eerily similar to yours. Google the name first and see what results you get. If you don’t get any exact (or close) matches, check with your State Incorporation site to see if there’s a company by the name you wish to use. You’ll want your company name and internet domain name to be the same if possible.

Don’t Fence Yourself In
You don’t want a name that won’t allow your business to grow, move and add to its product line, so don’t pick names that suggest a geographic location or a specific product category. You’d hate to open a new chain of stores in Florida but you’re saddled with the name TexasFlorists.

Finally, Media Plow has over 1000 names with suggested categories for each one. Peruse our listings of domain names and find one that works for you!